I am committed to representing Boulder County and all the communities of Colorado.  Here are the bills I have co-sponsored. You can read the full text of any bill that has been formally introduced on the General Assembly website: leg.colorado.gov. If you have questions or concerns please reach out to me.  My email address is edie.hooton.house@state.co.us.

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Edie Signature

2018 Regular Legislative Session

All forms of homelessness are troubling, but it’s especially bad when young people don’t have stable housing – and we should all know that this happens in Boulder County. Homelessness can be impactful to a young person’s healthy development on a number of levels, and in certain cases it’s hazardous to their safety. The task force would, in short, discuss and study issues and statistics, and suggest potential solutions to help keep young Coloradans safe and warm. The bill passed the House, but was postponed indefinitely on March 21 in the Senate State, Veterans, and Military Affairs Committee.

Climate change is one of the pressing issues of our time, so we should recognize individuals who lead efforts that could minimize the negative impacts. This bill will create awards programs within the state’s existing climate change position, with awards for organizational and collaborative greenhouse gas reduction programs. The bill was assigned to the House Transportation and Energy Committee for its first hearing, and was postponed indefinitely in that committee on Feb. 7.

This bill is one of several that I sponsored from the Statutory Revision Committee, designed to remove or amend outdated or redundant sections of state statutes. HB 18-1139 will remove references to reporting requirements for the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission that have been repealed. Governor John Hickenlooper signed HB 18-1139 into law on March 29, 2018.

The state’s Statutory Revision Committee recommended this bill be introduced in 2018. It will remove references in statute to “Early Childhood Care and Education Councils,” and replace them with the more modern phrase, “Early Childhood Councils.” Governor John Hickenlooper signed HB 18-1141 into law on March 22, 2018.

The Statutory Revision Committee recommended this bill for introduction in 2018. It will remove references to the antiquated term “pauper” or “paupers” from our statutes, and replace them with “indigent” or “indigent persons.” Governor John Hickenlooper signed HB 18-1142 into law on March 22, 2018.

The Statutory Revision Committee recommended this bill for introduction in 2018. It will repeal two laws that have been permanently enjoined from enforcement: one requiring petition circulators to be Colorado residents, and another limiting per-signature compensation for circulators. Governor John Hickenlooper signed HB 18-1145 into law on April 9, 2018.

This bill is designed to protect people, including elderly homeowners and new homeowners, from being charged excessive fees for documents by third-party entities. The bill limits the maximum fees these entities can charge, requires entities to provide a copy of the document to county clerk and recorders, and requires them to state that solicitations are not from local governments. Governor John Hickenlooper signed HB 18-1154 into law on April 12, 2018.

The state Department of Regulatory Agencies has recommended allowing Department of Agriculture regulation of home food service plans to sunset this year as scheduled, and this bill will allow the program to end. Governor John Hickenlooper signed HB 18-1183 into law on March 22, 2018.

This bill would have added “autism spectrum disorders” as a statutorily qualifying condition for recommending medical marijuana. HB 18-1263 passed the House and Senate, but Governor John Hickenlooper vetoed the bill on June 5, 2018.

This bill would require candidates for President and Vice President of the United States to file tax returns for the last five years with Colorado’s Secretary of State before their names can be printed on the ballot. The Secretary of State must also publish these returns on his or her website within seven days of the returns being filed. HB 18-1318 passed the House, but was postponed indefinitely on May 3 in the Senate State, Veterans, and Military Affairs Committee.

The Statutory Revision Committee recommended this bill for introduction during the 2018 session. The bill would remove statutory references to the Proposition AA refund account, which was repealed on July 1, 2017. Governor John Hickenlooper signed HB 18-1369 into law on May 24, 2018.

Current law requires each person who is convicted of a crime against a child to pay a surcharge to the clerk of the court for the judicial district in which the conviction occurs. SB 18-055 would add the crime of human trafficking of a minor for sexual servitude to the definition of a crime against a child for the purposes of the surcharge. Governor John Hickenlooper signed SB 18-055 into law on April 23, 2018.

The state’s Statutory Revision Committee recommended this bill to be introduced in 2018. It would call for modernizing statutory language referring to the “rights of married women” to be inclusive of men and women. Governor John Hickenlooper signed SB 18-090 into law on March 29, 2018.

The state’s Statutory Revision Committee recommended this bill to be introduced in 2018. It calls for modernizing outdated statutory references to “county departments of social services” or “human or social services,” since counties now have different ways of referring to departments providing these types of services. Governor John Hickenlooper signed SB 18-092 into law on March 15, 2018.

The state’s Statutory Revision Committee recommended this bill to be introduced in 2018. It calls for repeal of duplicate “definitions” sections for general provisions relating to behavior health. The bill has been signed by the Senate President and Speaker of the House, and is on the Governor’s desk for his approval.

The state’s Statutory Revision Committee recommended this bill to be introduced in 2018. It would remove outdated statutory references to “illegitimate” or “legitimate” children, and to a “child born out of wedlock.” Governor John Hickenlooper signed SB 18-095 into law on April 2, 2018.

The state’s Statutory Revision Committee recommended this bill to be introduced in 2018. It woudl amend statutory language regarding interest on damages, to reflect a Colorado Supreme Court decision saying that certain language in statute violated the Equal Protection Clause. Governor John Hickenlooper signed SB 18-098 into law on April 2, 2018.

The state’s Statutory Revision Committee recommended this bill be introduced in 2018. It would repeal a requirement for an odometer reading when a motor vehicle’s identification is physically verified. Governor John Hickenlooper signed SB 18-102 into law on March 29, 2018.

The state’s Statutory Revision Committee recommended this bill be introduced in 2018. It would bring the State Employees Group Benefits Act into compliance with federal law in several ways, including changing the definition of “dependent” to include children up to the age of 26, eliminating a requirement that children be full-time students to be considered a dependent after age 19, eliminating a requirement that a child be unmarried to be considered a dependent, and much more. Governor John Hickenlooper signed SB 18-131 into law on April 2, 2018.

This bill would extend an existing credit for taxes paid on tobacco products shipped or transported by a distributor to consumers outside of the state of Colorado. SB 18-179 passed the Senate and House, but Governor John Hickenlooper vetoed the bill on June 1, 2018.

This bill will increase the amount of money credited to the “Limited Gaming Impact Fund,” based on growth in the state share of limited gaming revenue. Governor John Hickenlooper signed SB 18-191 into law on May 29, 2018.

This bill would align state law regarding appraisal management companies with federal law. Governor John Hickenlooper signed SB 18-210 into law on May 29, 2018.

This bill clarifies that documents needed for certificates of titles and electronic signatures cannot be denied because they are electronic. Governor John Hickenlooper signed SB 18-255 into law on June 6, 2018.

This bill would authorize the use of medical marijuana in cases where opiates might be prescribed. SB 18-261 lost on a Senate third reading.

2017 Regular Legislative Session

The bill requires candidates for president and vice president of the United States to file with the secretary of state the candidates’ federal income tax return forms for the last 5 completed tax years. Neither the name of any candidate who fails to comply with the filing requirement nor the name of that candidate’s running mate shall be printed on the official ballot.

HB 17-1328 was postponed indefinitely in the Senate State, Veterans, and Military Affairs Committee on May 1, 2017.

The bill requires barbers, hairstylists, cosmetologists, estheticians, and nail technicians, as part of the requirement to renew their professional licenses, to take a one-time training course for one hour on domestic violence and sexual assault awareness. The bill does not impose a mandatory reporting requirement on these professionals and specifically grants them immunity from civil and criminal liability for reporting or failing to report potential domestic violence or sexual assault.

Here’s a TV report from Channel 9. https://t.co/GbV5u6A5ts

HB-1175 was postponed indefinitely in the Senate State, Veterans, and Military Affairs Committee on April 12, 2017.

The bill allows persons who were convicted of misdemeanors for the use or possession of marijuana to petition for the sealing of criminal records relating to such convictions if their behavior would not have been a criminal offense if the behavior had occurred on or after December 10, 2012.

Governor John Hickenlooper signed HB 17-1266 into law on June 6, 2017.

The bill consolidates and clarifies various statutory sections concerning reductions of sentences for county jail inmates. The idea is to make sure that Good Time sentence reduction practices are followed uniformly in all Counties in Colorado.

Governor John Hickenlooper signed HB 17-1015 into law on March 23, 2017.

Under current law, institutions of higher education are limited in the number and length of term employment contracts or contract extensions that the institution can award. In addition, institutions are prohibited from providing postemployment compensation or benefits to a government-supported employee after the individual’s employment has ended, except in limited situations and in limited amounts. Further, under current law, the terms of government-supported employment contracts are generally available for public inspection.

For state institutions of higher education, the bill exempts the institution’s employee positions that are funded by revenues generated through auxiliary activities, as defined in the bill, from the provisions of current law.

Governor John Hickenlooper signed SB 17-041 into law on March 20, 2017.

The bill prohibits a school district, board of cooperative services, charter school, or public preschool program from expelling a student, except as specifically required by federal law, and allows the enrolling entity to impose an out-of- school suspension on the student only under specified circumstances for 3 school days. The bill also specifies that school districts are required to adopt prevention and early intervention strategies to reduce the need for early childhood and early elementary grade suspensions and expulsions. Research shows that early childhood school attendance is a leading indicator in high school graduation and likelihood of incarceration.

HB 17-1210  was postponed indefinitely in the Senate State, Veterans, and Military Affairs Committee on April 17, 2017.

The bill lays out that at least 60 days before implementing a decision to terminate or place a participating provider in a tiered network, a carrier must notify the affected provider in writing of the pending action, including an explanation of the reasons for the proposed action, and inform the provider of the right to request that the carrier reconsider its decision. This would provide some protections for providers so they are not as easily dropped from coverage, which can have negative ramifications for patients.

Governor John Hickenlooper signed SB 17-088 into law on April 18, 2017.

This bill requires investor-owned electric utilities to provide their customers with a comprehensive breakdown of cost on their monthly bills because consumers have a right to know their electric utility charges.

Governor John Hickenlooper signed SB 17-105 into law on May 22, 2017.

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